STATEMENT OF SENATOR EDWARD M. KENNEDY ON GENDER-EQUITY LEGISLATION

STATEMENT OF SENATOR EDWARD M. KENNEDY ON GENDER-EQUITY LEGISLATION

September 15, 1993

As we work to improve all aspects of education, one of the most
serious challenges we face is the gender inequality that pervades
education. The landmark 1992 study by the American Association of
University Women refutes the common assumption that boys and girls
are treated equally in our educational system. Clearly, they are
not.

Despite the provisions of Title IX prohibiting sex discrimination
in schools receiving federal funds, we continue to see differences
in the educational achievement of boys and girls. Different teacher
practices and different expectations result in much lower performance
by [some -- drice] girls on [some -- drice] standardized tests
especially in math and science.

The second class stigma is perpetuated through colleges and into
the workplace. The end result is that women have less opportunity
than men throughout their careers. It is no coincidence that women
earn only $0.45 [that low?! who says?-- drice] for every dollar
earned by men, even though they constitute nearly half the workforce.
In a sense, the glass ceiling is put in place in the school room,
and that is the place where we must do more to dismantle it.

The 1993 Gender Equity Education bills address these problems
systematically and comprehensively. The principal provisions will
encourage leadership training programs for girls; improve research
on equity issues; improve the quality of math and science
instruction; enhance dropout prevention programs; reduce the
incidence of sexual harassment in schools; provide grants to schools
to implement gender equity programs; and require colleges that
receive federal funds to provide data on women's participation
in intercollegiate athletics.

We will address many of these issues as part of reauthorization
of the Elementary and Secondary School Act. Wherever possible, we
intend to incorporate gender-equity provisions in all federal
education programs.

The nation's future depends on better education for all students --
and when we say all, we mean all. It is time to eliminate gender
bias from all aspects of education, at all levels, and for all
women.
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Anita Hill could tell us just how much Senator's give a shit
about gender equality. . . .


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