A woman's had a bad day at work and wants to talk about it. Will her spouse or boyfriend brush it off or chat sympathetically? That may depends how old he is

 |    NEW YORK, August 25,1993 (AP) -- A woman's had a bad day at work
 | and wants to talk about it. Will her husband or boyfriend
 | brush it off or chat sympathetically? That may depends how old
 | he is, according a poll released Wednesday.
 |    The "She Says, He Says" national poll of 1,000 adults found
 | only about one in five women in their 40s and above -- 21
 | percent -- thought they'd find a shoulder to cry on. Among
 | those in their 30s, twice as many women -- 42 percent -- felt
 | they'd get sympathy.
 |    Of the men in their 40s, 33 percent said they would be
 | there for their mate; among the 30-year-olds, it was 44
 | percent.
 |    Another example: their child is hit with an unexpected
 | illness. The woman's boss makes it clear she must show up at
 | work. Who stays home with the child?
 |    Thirty-one percent of the older women said they wouldn't
 | even ask their husband to take the day off. Fifty percent of
 | the younger women said they would immediately ask their
 | husband to stay home.
 |    The men's side: They are willing to help out. Fifty percent
 | of the thirtysomethings said they would offer to stay home; 58
 | percent of the older men said they would do the same thing.
 |    The poll was conducted by Ethel Klein of EDK Associates, an
 | expert on gender issues, for the No Nonsense Gender Dynamics
 | Research Program, a group of female publishers and educators
 | funded by a hosiery company. 
 |    Results have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3
 | percentage points.


Webactivism
Qnet
NameandShame